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  • Hastein - Creed Viking Scented Luxury Soy Candle (250ml) - Oswald's Tree Candle Co.
  • Hastein - Creed Viking Scented Luxury Soy Candle (250ml) - Oswald's Tree Candle Co.
  • Hastein - Creed Viking Scented Luxury Soy Candle (250ml) - Oswald's Tree Candle Co.
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Oswald's Tree Candle Co.

Hastein - Creed Viking Scented Luxury Soy Candle (250ml)

Regular price £10.00 GBP
Regular price Sale price £10.00 GBP
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Presents with fresh citrus notes of Calabrian bergamot and Sicilian lemon with pink peppercorn, Bulgarian rose and peppermint. Woody base notes of Indian Sandalwood and Haitian vetiver complete this masculine masterpiece.


This amazingly scented candle burns for approximately 35 hours and has a strong scent throw that will fully fragrance an average-sized room.

Inspiration

Viking raids began in England in the late 8th century and Wales in the mid 9th century. The raiding continued on and off until the 860s, when instead of raiding the Viking changed their tactics and sent a great army to invade England. This army was described by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as a "Great Heathen Army". Alfred defeated the Great Heathen Army at the Battle of Edington in 878. A treaty followed whereby Alfred ceded an enlarged East Anglia to the Danes.

After Edington, Alfred reorganised the defences of Wessex, he built a navy and a standing army. He also built a series of fortified towns, known as burhs that ringed Wessex. To maintain the burhs, and the standing army, he set up a taxation system known as the Burghal Hidage. Viking raids still continued but his defences made it difficult for the Vikings to make progress. As the political system in Francia (part of modern day France) was in turmoil the Vikings concentrated their efforts there as the raiding was more profitable.

By late 892 the leadership in Francia had become more stable and the Vikings were finding it difficult to make progress there too, so they again attempted a conquest of England. In 893 two hundred and fifty ships landed an army in the Lympne Estuary in Kent where they built a fortification at Appledore. A smaller force of eighty ships under Hastein landed in the Thames estuary before entrenching themselves at Milton, also in Kent. The invaders brought their wives and children with them, indicating a meaningful attempt at conquest and colonisation. Alfred took up a position from which he could observe both of the Viking armies. The Vikings were further reinforced with 240 ships, that were provided by the Danes of East Anglia and Northumbria who had settled there after the wars of the 860s and 870s. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle says that they did it "contrary to [their] pledges."

At some point Alfred's army captured Hastein's family. The annals report that Alfred was in talks with Hastein, but do not say why. Horspool speculates that it may well be to do with Hastein's family, however while the talks were going on, the Danes at Appledore broke out and struck northwestwards. They were overtaken by Alfred's eldest son, Edward, and were defeated in a general engagement at Farnham in Surrey. They took refuge on an island at Thorney, on Hertfordshire's River Colne, where they were blockaded and were ultimately forced to submit. The force fell back on Essex and, after suffering another defeat at Benfleet, joined Hastein's army at Shoebury.

Alfred had been on his way to relieve his son at Thorney when he heard that the Northumbrian and East Anglian Danes were besieging Exeter and an unnamed[g] burh on the North Devon shore. Alfred at once hurried westward and when he arrived at Exeter, the Danes took to their ships. The siege of Exeter was lifted but the fate of the unnamed North Devon burh is not recorded. Meanwhile, the force under Hastein set out to march up the Thames Valley, possibly with the idea of assisting their friends in the west. After wintering at Quatbridge near Bridgnorth they moved westwards once more but they were met by the Western army that consisted of West Saxons, Mercians, and some Welsh, it was led by three eldermen namely Æthelred the Lord of the Mercians, Æthelhelm the Ealdorman of Wiltshire, and Æthelnoth the Ealdorman of Somerset. The chronicle says that they "were drawn from every burh east of the Parret; both west and east of Selwood, also north of the Thames and west of the Severn as well as some part of the Welsh people". Æthelred, although a Mercian, was married to Alfred's daughter and thus as his son in law was able to cross the borders of Wessex in pursuit of Vikings. The combined Anglo-Saxon and Welsh army forced the Vikings to the northwest, where they were finally overtaken and besieged at Buttington.

A map of places named in the Burghal Hidage

The English and Welsh army came up the River Severn, and besieged all sides of the fortification (at Buttington) where the Vikings had taken refuge. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle says that "after many weeks had passed, some of the heathen [Vikings] died of hunger, but some, having by then eaten their horses, broke out of the fortress, and joined battle with those who were on the east bank of the river. But, when many thousands of pagans had been slain, and all the others had been put to flight, the Christians [English and Welsh] were masters of the place of death. In that battle, the most noble Ordheah and many of the king's thegns were killed."

Allergens

IMONENE, LINALOOL, LINALYLACETATE

Safety

Never leave a burning candle unattended. Burn candles out of reach of children and pets. Always leave about 10cm between burning candles. Do not burn candles on or near anything that may catch fire. Only burn this candle on a level, heat-resistant surface. 

Never burn this candle for more than 4 hours at a time. Do not allow the flame to touch the glass. On the first burn, always burn for 3-4 hours to ensure an even melt pool. Ensure the wick is upright, above the wax, and central before the wax sets. Always trim the wick to 5mm before lighting to avoid smoking and damage to the glass. Glass may become hot during use. Extinguish when 5mm of wax remains and do not relight.